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Submitted on
June 15, 2013
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877 KB
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3400×2267
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Camera Data

Make
NIKON CORPORATION
Model
NIKON D700
Shutter Speed
1/640 second
Aperture
F/8.0
Focal Length
180 mm
ISO Speed
1250
Date Taken
Jun 15, 2013, 10:17:20 AM
Software
Adobe Photoshop CS6 (Windows)
×
Common Tit by inckurei Common Tit by inckurei
Hypolycaena erylus teatus
Common Tit
Details
Family: Lycaenidae
Subfamily: Lycaeninae
Genus: Hypolycaena
Species: erylus teatus
Common Name: Common Tit
Wingspan:
Forms:
Status in Singapore:
Life History: complete
This butterfly can be found in: •Malaysia •Singapore
Hostplant(s): Averrhoa carambola (Star Fruit) Hibiscus tiliaceus (Sea Hibiscus) Ixora javanica (Javanese Ixora) Saraca cauliflora (Yellow Saraca) Senna fistula (Golden Showers)

Description
The upperside of the male is deep purple blue with a large circular brand on the forewing disc. The female is dull grey-brown and black marginal spots on the greyish white tornal area of the hindwing. The undersides of both sexes are a pale greenish grey with a cell-end bar and a narrow reddish brown post discal line on each wing. There is an orange-crowned black spot and a smaller one on the hindwings.

Habitat & Habits
The Common Tit has been found in a variety of localities in Singapore, from the mangrove-type environment of Sg Buloh Nature Park, to the forested Central Catchment and even in downtown Singapore along traffic congested Victoria Street ! At the last location, the caterpillars of the species were found feeding on the roadside ornamental plant Ixora javanica (Javanese Ixora) in the heart of town. This is probably a new record of the host plant for this species. The caterpillars collected were bred to adulthood.

Other Observations
There are two tails originating from veins 1b and 2 from the hindwing. The species behaves in the typical Lycaenid behaviour of sliding the hindwings in a fashion where the tails appear to be alive. This acts as a decoy to fool predators into thinking that the rear end of the butterfly is the head with the antennae and "eyes".

Source: ButterflyCircle
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