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August 8, 2010
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Fraser's Hill

Journal Entry: Sun Aug 8, 2010, 4:19 AM



Brief History:
Fraser's Hill derives its name from Louis James Fraser, a solitary Scottish pioneer, who set up a tin-ore trading post in the 1890s.[3][4] The British army had not explored the Titiwangsa Range, so Fraser recruited guides and coolies for an expedition to the upper ridges, prospecting for gold or other valuable metals. At the top he found an ancient forest of moss-draped trees and ferns with a prehistoric appearance, kept constantly moist in the cloud layer.

Source: Wikipedia

Location:
Fraser's Hill includes seven peaks, with altitudes between 1,220 and 1,525 meters above sea level.[8] The Meteorological Department station is measured at 1,280 m. Year round temperatures are between 17°C~25°C / 63°F~77°F.

Source: Wikipedia

The Gap is a steep road leading up to Fraser's Hill. It is a single tracked road winding up to the hill top, and it alternates for traffic to go up and down The Gap.

Well, there is quite a lot to do up on this hill, although it is quite a quiet place during off peak season. There were a huge variety of butterflies to be seen at Fraser's Hill, especially the moist banks of streams. Butterflies can be seen puddling under the intense morning/afternoon sun, despite being hot, it was cooling as compared to Singapore. Most of us who went for the trip did not sweat much whilst trekking and shooting during our trip to Fraser's Hill.

Some butterfly Photos from Fraser's Hill.



  • Mood: Optimism
  • Listening to: Sirens Of The Sea
  • Reading: http://my.deviantart.com/journal/ <--this url
  • Watching: National Geographic Channel
  • Playing: my toes
  • Eating: air
  • Drinking: h2o
Add a Comment:
 
:iconpheloy:
pheloy Featured By Owner Aug 16, 2010  Hobbyist Photographer
great job you did in here!! :)
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:iconinckurei:
inckurei Featured By Owner Aug 17, 2010  Hobbyist Photographer
Thank you :) I highly recommend any nature lover to visit that place!
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:iconalokethebloke:
alokethebloke Featured By Owner Aug 8, 2010  Hobbyist Photographer
Beautiful photographs :)! I must pay this place a visit :)!!!
Reply
:iconinckurei:
inckurei Featured By Owner Aug 8, 2010  Hobbyist Photographer
It is indeed a great place to visit. Heres an article of Fraser's Hill.
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:iconalokethebloke:
alokethebloke Featured By Owner Aug 9, 2010  Hobbyist Photographer
Thank you for the article :)! If you wanted to 'poison' me (as they say in Singapore), you've done it:).

I will be visiting Kota Kinabalu soon, so Fraser's hill will have to wait until after that - but I hope I can make it there sometime this year :).

Again, your photographs are beautiful. Certainly of great inspiration to me, because I generally settle for subjects that aren't as skittish as butterflies.
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:iconinckurei:
inckurei Featured By Owner Aug 9, 2010  Hobbyist Photographer
Hahah, you are welcomed :P

Kota Kinabalu should have a fair share of butterflies too, I hope i can see some butterflies from you :)

Thanks for the kind words!
Reply
:iconalokethebloke:
alokethebloke Featured By Owner Aug 12, 2010  Hobbyist Photographer
I have a question please :)!! What apertures do you usually use for butterflies :)? Around 5.6 to 7.1? Do you ever go smaller?
Reply
:iconinckurei:
inckurei Featured By Owner Aug 12, 2010  Hobbyist Photographer
You can see the apertures in the exif in the photos. It usually depends on the situation. I often like wider apertures due to the fact that it gives me a nice clean and undistracting background. However, with smaller apertures, it does require higher shutter speeds (i shoot handheld most of the time), and it has too much of the background in the shot. Butterflies are more or less 2 dimensional objects if you think about it, so I usually use just enough DOF to cover the butterfly. There is never a fixed aperture range or setting that I use.

I hope this answer your questions.
Reply
:iconalokethebloke:
alokethebloke Featured By Owner Aug 12, 2010  Hobbyist Photographer
Yes :)! Thank you!! I didn't realise you'd included the EXIF data :). You're right, butterflies don't require very wide DOFs and the wider apertures do make for nicer backgrounds. I was just wondering about your backgrounds, and to what extent they were affected by the focal length of your Tamron lens (which is truly an incredible lens in the right hands ) and also by the apertures you use.

I love damselflies, and I've been trying to find more of them lately - and yes, I think I favour wider apertures for the cleaner backgrounds.
Reply
:iconinckurei:
inckurei Featured By Owner Aug 13, 2010  Hobbyist Photographer
MMmm, that is a tough one to answer, since it is a prime lens, the focal length is always 180mm. Normally for bigger sized butterflies, it will be harder to get the background clean. As for the smaller ones, they are harder to get in focused due to the very shallow DOF at near 1:1. Most of the time, I will try to tilt the lens ever so slightly so that I can get a all green background.

Well having said that, it all really depends on the subject and given conditions. I would probably shoot at f16 if I can get a nice clean BG as well as a high enough shutter speed, but I am sure that shooting conditions will never be so favourable all the time.
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